ICAA Intensive in Classical Architectural Design : LA

Among the ICAA’s most impactful and enduring education models is its Intensive Program in Classical Architecture – an eight day course of study that introduces participants to the ICAA’s core curriculum through coursework in the classical orders, composition, proportion, drafting, observational drawing, and the literature of classical architecture. Due to unprecedented demand for the 2017 ICAA Intensive in Classical Architecture in New York, the ICAA Southern California Chapter, in collaboration with the ICAA National Office, hosted an additional Intensive program this Fall.

Students complete some plein air sketches outside the intensive in Classical Architecture: LA's classroom location for the week, Greystone Mansion

Students complete some plein air sketches outside the intensive in Classical Architecture: LA’s classroom location for the week, Greystone Mansion

Last week the Southern California Chapter hosted the very first ICAA Regional Intensive in Classical Architecture, at Greystone Mansion which served as an incredible venue and inspiration to the Intensive students during their studies. The intensive spanned eight-days, introducing participants to the ICAA’s core curriculum through coursework in the classical orders, composition, proportion, drafting, observational drawing, and the literature of classical architecture. The students spent a full week in the studio and outdoors, taking advantage of the incredible classical architecture around them at Greystone mansion.

Students work at their desks as Michael Mesko looks on and guides drawings

Students work at their desks as Michael Mesko looks on and guides drawings

Instructors included David Genther and Michael Mesko, New York Intensive regulars,  local instructors Domiane Forte, Erik Evens, Patricia Poundstone and more. The instructors taught subjects that informed the students’ final projects which they worked on intermittently during studio time.  Instructor, Chris Eiland, remarked “Students produced very successful projects in a short period of time” saying that he witnessed the programs ability to “open their eyes to a design approach and methodology they can apply regardless of style or scale”

Instructor Marty Brandwein reviews a student’s work at Greystone Mansion

Instructor Marty Brandwein reviews a student’s work at Greystone Mansion

The week culminated in a final design project where students designed a pavilion for Greystone mansion. Students were given background and thoroughly acquainted with Greystone grounds before applying the lessons they’d learned all week to the presentation. For the final review Southern California Chapter members were invited to view the students’ work. The students reflected on the program with  Mike Tracy from Kirk Peterson Associates saying he has not only found the Intensive is getting him on the “right path to good design” but that its drawing component “is probably the one thing I could do for 10 hours a day and enjoy.” He spoke more generally about the value of Classical Architecture saying that it has “stood the test of time–it’s 2,000 years old and there’s a reason for that.”

Students Completing a Measured Drawing Exercise

Students Completing a Measured Drawing Exercise

Sara Pijuan a Project Manager in Evens Architecture’s Green Studio, which specializes in traditional architecture, remarked that while before she used to have to outsource for content like that which she learned during the intensive, she has “more confidence now to take a stab at the details” and can be “a better resource for the office that way.” She believes it would be helpful for colleges to teach undergraduates the principles taught in the Intensive, remarking that they’re universally applicable “it helps you build a foundation–even if you are working on a lot of modern projects, the principles carry through.”

Students take their studio work outside under the guidance of Intensive instructors

Students take their studio work outside under the guidance of Intensive instructors

Many thanks to the sponsorship and fundraising by the Southern California chapter without which the Intensive would not have been possible.

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Drawing Classical Archways from Rome through the Renaissance

The design of archways is complex, requiring a great attention to detail and understanding of geometric form to create a stable and elegant structure. In classical architecture, the difficulty of construction is heightened—as is the end product—by the combination of the arch itself with the canonical orders to create a perfectly-balanced composition. On Saturday, October 21, the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art held the course Advanced Classical Elements: Arches, which provided an overview of key elements of classical arch design: their construction, aesthetic composition, usage, and drafting.

Instructor Mason Roberts began the course with a lecture on the history of the classical arch. After an overview of the basic elements of the arch and how they interact with each other—such as the keystone, voussoirs, and the necessity of infill for weight bearing arches—Mr. Roberts discussed how the arch has developed over time. He began with an explanation of how it was the Romans who created the arch as it is used today in classical architecture by combining the canonical orders with the purely utilitarian archways used by the ancient Greeks. Throughout his history of classical arches, Mr. Roberts discussed different kinds of arches and how their uses changed over time. Segmental arches, for example, were used by the Romans only as a utilitarian structure, but have been used decoratively since the middle ages. The history also examined the properties of arches and their basic geometry, such as the catenary arch, a complex form that is able to stand freely.

After a short break, the lecture continued with a general review of the canonical orders and their proportions. Examples of Roman, Renaissance, and modern architecture incorporating classical arches were reviewed. Finally, following a discussion of the advances in classical archways by 16th century architect Andrea Palladio, students participated in a guided sketch of a Palladian arch and a Roman arch. Mr. Roberts guided students through each step of both exercises, and assistant Martin Brandwein gave students individual help. At the end of the class, students had a much greater understanding of the history of classical arches, their design considerations, and their proportions.

IMG_2496 A finished study of a Roman archway (using the Corinthian order) by student Salvatore Cicerelli

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Taking Moldings from Profiles to Practice

Following a foundational study of molding forms, classical architecture requires an understanding of how moldings fit into a full architectural work. In order to translate an academic knowledge of moldings into a masterful composition, one must comprehend how moldings are planned, constructed, and installed. In the course Advanced Classical Elements: Moldings in Practice, instructor David Ellison showed students how moldings come to life.

Mr. Ellison began the lecture with a quick overview of the shapes and proportions of moldings, as well as how they interact with light and overall composition. He then began to discuss real examples of applications of moldings alongside critique and recommendations for future work. For example, he showed how heavy repetition of the same molding type on a crown creates a dull look with no dominant shape or interesting shadows. His point was reinforced with a discussion of how moldings are used to create visual interest. Aspects of combining multiple moldings, such as creating harmonious facial angles, were detailed. Each student was given a beautiful book of reference materials on moldings and balanced molding design, which helped elucidate the material and which they could take home for further study.

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After the lecture on design considerations, students learned the process of making and installing moldings. Various tools, material sources, and workshop processes were studied, with Mr. Ellison exploring all kinds of potential molding materials: stone, wood, metal, and plaster. The comprehensive overview highlighted the uses and idiosyncrasies of each material, such as the options for changing a material’s color, giving students a better understanding of what they could use in their own practice. During a break, students examined molding samples constructed with different materials to illustrate the lecture. The course ended with an extensive set of recommendations for further research on moldings, from classic manuals such as Letarouilly to studies of Gothic, Georgian, and Victorian moldings. Students left the course with an appreciation for all aspects of the creation and design of moldings, as well as a renewed sense of how moldings can be incorporated into new works.

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New Heights 2017 at the Marymount School

Students from the Marymount school studying the façade of a classical building in Manhattan

Students from the Marymount school studying the façade of a classical building in Manhattan

In early October, the ICAA facilitated the New Heights program at the Marymount School on the Upper East Side. This is now the third year that the ICAA has run the program at Marymount. The goal is to engage the 8th grade class in a dynamic study of classical architecture through meaningful observation, critical thinking, field study, and studio experiences.

New Heights students on a walking tour of the Upper East Side in Manhattan, sketchbooks in hand

Students on a walking tour of the Upper East Side in Manhattan, sketchbooks in hand

The program consisted of walking tours in neighborhoods abundant in classical architecture, lecture/discussion sessions about Classical Architecture, and building craft workshops. In addition, and now for the second year, a Design Challenge was facilitated by a group of professional architects.

Design Coach Sarah Magness demonstrating drawing technique to her design group

Design Coach Sarah Magness demonstrating drawing technique to her design group

In this notional exercise, students broken into groups of three were asked to design a new entry as part of a new classical facade for the 97th Street Marymount School campus. Marymount plans to ‘re-skin’ the front of the building to properly represent the values of the School. The students were asked to develop both the physical design and a written narrative that described the themes of their final work. Throughout the week, studio sessions were facilitated by design coaches who guided the students in the development of their ideas.

Instructor and Design Coach Michael Romero listening to a student’s ideas on design

Instructor and Design Coach Michael Romero listening to a student’s ideas on design

By the end of the week the students were able to use a new vocabulary, both verbal and visual, to express their ideas for a final design to a panel of architects from prestigious local firms. The dynamic combination of the design challenge studios and the tactile, educational sessions has created a lasting impact on each student and how she views the world.

Students sketching and taking notes while out on a walking tour

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Jane Jacobs’ Greenwich Village

On Saturday, October 7, a group of designers, architects, engineers, and enthusiasts met at Washington Square Park in order to examine both the general principles of traditional urbanism and the specific history of Greenwich Village through the The Urbanism of Greenwich Village walking tour.

The tour took place on a mild, sunny day, perfect for enjoying the sights of Greenwich Village. Instructors Michael Geller and Rodrigo Bollat Montenegro began with a discussion of Washington Square Park and, as with the other destinations on the tour, its interesting history. They noted, for example, how the area was a bastion of Jane Jacobs’s campaign against Robert Moses’s development plans, which included an effort to replace the park with thoroughfare space. The discussion then turned to how the park has been masterfully designed to fit into Greenwich Village as a whole. Their instruction was supplemented by both handouts showing the historical layout of the Village and the real-life surroundings of the tour.

Instructor Rodrigo Bollat Montenegro discusses the history of Washington Square Park.

Instructor Rodrigo Bollat Montenegro discusses the history of Washington Square Park.

Much of the tour focused on the importance of transitional spaces in creating coherent urban landscapes. Among many other sites, the tour visited the entrance to the NYU School of Law. The instructors spoke about how the classical styling of the entrance, including an arcade, stairs, and a forecourt, brought out its transitional nature. While each individual archway and set of stairs provides only a subtle cue as to the nature of the space, together they build up to a strong perception of a tangible transition from the public street to the semi-public outdoor court to the private interior. Classical elements such as base moldings also create a transition from the street to the building itself. These elements are essential to urban planning, as they allow people to clearly parse the meaning of urban space.

Students observe the transitional elements of the NYU School of Law entrance.

Students observe the transitional elements of the NYU School of Law entrance.

During the pleasant walks between destinations, students were encouraged to discuss the sites with each other and ask questions to the instructors. At several locations, such as the Washington Mews, students completed observational sketches to help them understand key spatial relationships in urban planning, such as how the relative sizes of roads, sidewalks, and buildings synthesize to elicit specific impacts on different kinds of streets. The class gave the participants both a better understanding of the specific architectural history of Greenwich Village and a better appreciation of how the principles of urban planning are used to create beautiful cityscapes.

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Daily Inspiration from the Christopher H. Browne Paris Drawing Tour

Follow the ICAA daily from October 7-14 as we study the classical architecture, interiors, and landscapes of Paris through observational drawing and painting. Based on the ICAA’s annual Christopher H. Browne Rome Drawing Tour, the Paris program is led by prominent architect Kahlil Hamady and designer Leslie-jon Vickory, alongside renowned watercolorists, Bernd Dams and Andrew Zega. Daily blog posts are provided courtesy of ICAA staff and participants of the program.

Connor Moran's watercolor wash of Sacré Cœur from Rue du Chevalier de la Barre

Connor Moran’s watercolor wash of Sacré Cœur from Rue du Chevalier de la Barre

October 14th, by Connor Moran: On Saturday, the final day of the tour, the group was given time to practice sketching techniques learned throughout the week in a location of their choice. I used this free day to climb Montmartre and study the tower of Sacré Cœur. Making my way up the western side of the hill, I ran into the Montmartre Harvest Festival parade. Musicians, performers, and tourists crowded the winding, narrow streets of painter’s shops and artist’s residences, ideally setting the tone for a spirited drawing.

Student Works being viewed at Saturday's final dinner and review

Student work by Christian Arndt viewed at Saturday’s final dinner and review

I finished the climb and posted up at a bustling cafe on Rue du Chevalier de la Barre with a perfectly framed view of Sacré Cœur’s towering northern spire. Here I worked on capturing the scene for almost two hours before packing up and heading back towards the Zega & Dams atelier for the tour’s farewell dinner.

Elevations of Petit Trianon by Cindy Black, one a studio rendering in full watercolor, the other, plein air in watercolor wash

Elevations of Petit Trianon by Cindy Black, one a studio rendering in full watercolor, the other, plein air in watercolor wash

Once at the atelier, the tour’s participants exhibited their sketches and renderings completed over the course of the week, highlighting the lessons that impacted them most and receiving comments from the instructors and colleagues. The review was followed by an incredible home-cooked French meal and words from our instructors, bringing the tour to an inspiring close.

Elaine Rose's sketch of Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève

Elaine Rose’s sketch of Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève

Birch Coffey showing an architectural detail from his sketchbook

Birch Coffey showing an architectural detail from his sketchbook

The group sketches the facade of the Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève from across the street by the Panthèon

The group sketches the facade of the Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève from across the street by the Panthèon

October 13th, by Elaine Rose: On Friday, the group met in the neighborhood of the Panthèon to commence a day of library tours. We visited and sketched three sites – Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève, Bibliothèque nationale de France, and Bibliothèque Mazarine.

The group looking at Labrouste's drawings at Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève

The group looking at Labrouste’s drawings at Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève

The first site was Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève: following a tour led by Mme. de La Mure the Bibliothèque’s archivist, before opening hours, we viewed architect Henri Labrouste’s original drawings, a collection that includes preliminary design sketches, furniture drawings, and final watercolors. 

Kahlil Hamady instructing Carol Guthrie at Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève

Kahlil Hamady instructing Carol Guthrie at Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève

The next few hours were spent sketching the soaring reading room which we gained access to with our newly minted library cards.

Madison Head, Kahlil Hamady and Christian Arndt compare Labrouste's later work to his first library at Bibliothèque nationale de France

Madison Head, Kahlil Hamady and Christian Arndt compare Labrouste’s later work to his first library at Bibliothèque nationale de France

Our second trip was to the Bibliothèque nationale de France, where we saw additional spaces designed by Labrouste. The reading room was an incredible, skylit space populated with elegant iron columns supporting a nine-square of sail vaults.

The group, including Geoffrey Barnes, Madison Head, Christian Arndt, and Cindy Black, drawing at Bibliothèque Mazarine

The group, including Geoffrey Barnes, Madison Head, Christian Arndt, and Cindy Black, drawing at Bibliothèque Mazarine

We ended the day with a tour of the Bibliothèque Mazarine, located within the Palais de l’Institut de France. A complex sequence of spaces culminated with an ascent up an oval staircase to a private reading room. Many students drew measured plans to decipher the progression of spaces there.

Connor Moran looks up from his work at the Palais de l'Institut de France's stairs to Bibliothèque Mazarine as group members Elaine Rose, Ryan Hughes, and Madison Head sketch their surroundings

Connor Moran looks up from his work at the Palais de l’Institut de France’s stairs to Bibliothèque Mazarine as group members Elaine Rose, Ryan Hughes, and Madison Head sketch their surroundings

 

M. Francois Jourdan leads the group through the Fondation de Coubertin’s sculpture garden

October 12th, by Geoffrey Barnes: Outside of Paris is a foundation dedicated to traditional craft and artistry as well as to the value and importance of honest labor. Established in the 1950s with the generosity of Yvonne de Coubertin and the collaboration of the director, Jean Bernard, The Fondation de Coubertin educates the next generation of artisans and experts in traditional craft. It takes great advantage of the Coubertin grounds and Chateau, with thoroughly modern workshops and sculpture gardens alongside centuries-old buildings and reference material.

Cindy Black, sketching one of the steps of the lost wax method of casting bronze

Cindy Black, sketching one of the steps of the lost wax method of casting bronze

On a clear, early fall day we arrived and walked the drive to the Chateau. After a breather and some coffee, we began the tour, which would include visits to the various ateliers and lunch with the artisans. We were able to visit with stone masons, blacksmiths, carpenters, and gilders, who were working on contemporary jobs in addition to prestigious cultural restorations such as the Louvre and Versailles. Each of them impressed the importance of preserving the cultural heritage of craftwork, not just in textbooks and videos, but in the real act of doing. They shared their drawings and sketches and demonstrated techniques for creating beautiful, lasting works of art.

M. Serge Pascal, one of the chief restorers of the Statue of Liberty, shares his own full-scale hand drawings essential to his craft

M. Serge Pascal, one of the chief restorers of the Statue of Liberty, shares his own full-scale hand drawings essential to his craft

M. Serge Pascal, who is receiving a Medal of Honor for his work, showed us how he takes a flat millimeter-thick piece of iron and transforms it into a piece of foliage with curves in all directions, a technique called repoussé, which no computer or CNC machine could recreate. He told us how his anvil and hammer were his musical instrument and he pinged out clear notes while deftly shaping metal. Monsieur Remy showed us a wrought-iron bannister whose panels were so complex that he produced a 1 to 1 hand-drawn template, as often happens at the Fondation.

A metalsmith working at his forge

Apprentices from all over France come to the fondation as part their tour of compagnonnage.  Their education, in addition to their craft, also includes philosophy, language and liberal arts coursework. They live and work at the fondation to practice and advance their connaissance, or “know-how” that the Fondation represents. The Chateau houses their reference library, with one of the earliest French translations of Vitruvius.

Participants review historical drawings used by the metal craftsmen of the Fondation in their restoration of les Grilles de Nancy

Participants review historical drawings used by the metal craftsmen of the Fondation in their restoration of les Grilles de Nancy

This transmission and preservation of knowledge, with respect for those who came before, and hope for those to come, are the hallmarks of the compagnonnage and it allows them to produce works of cultural importance and beauty that far exceed the sum of their parts.

The Christopher H. Browne Paris Drawing Tour group at Fondation de Coubertin

The Christopher H. Browne Paris Drawing Tour group at Fondation de Coubertin

 

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Watercolorist and Christopher H. Browne Drawing Tour Instructor Andrew Zega demonstrates how to render the Petit Trianon with his tire ligne (left); Madison Head mixes watercolors per Andrew Zega’s instruction for her watercolor rendering (right)

October 11th, by Madison Head: Wednesday was dedicated entirely to studio watercolor sessions. Twelve seats spread between two tables and a fresh pot of hot coffee greeted us at the Studio of Andrew Zega and Bernd Dams in the morning along with a prepared drawing of a partial elevation, plan, and section of the south elevation of the Petit Trianon, stretched and stapled on watercolor board, courtesy of Kahlil and Leslie-jon. I was seated amongst professionals from LA, Rhode Island, and Chicago — this group could not be more fun and interesting!

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A Petit Trianon watercolor work in progress

With Andrew at the helm, we learned step-by-step how to prepare our drawings for the base washes and execute color variations in stone. After a baguette sandwich and a quick jaunt to the famous Berthillon ice cream parlor over lunch, we returned to studio to apply shadows, render columns and carefully draw and paint in the color of our window panes, the last step in a watercolor rendering. Andrew also shared some exclusive tips on rendering the natural wear and soot of a building.

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Connor Moran’s progress on a watercolor rendering of the Petit Trianon at the end of the day’s session

Time flew! At the end of the day, we walked away with a partially completed watercolor of the exterior elevation of the Petit Trianon — a clean print with details of a mantle to complete in our own time, and, most importantly, the invaluable know-how and confidence to take on another watercolor of another building in another city.

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Participants Elaine Rose and Connor Moran sketching the interior of the Belvédère

October 10th, by Maggie Jones: Today we went to visit the Petit Trianon which is located on the grounds of the Palace of Versailles. This was truly a one of a kind experience as we had the whole grounds to ourselves and could wander about freely and even go into areas that are typically closed to the public including the Pavillon Français, Théâtre de la Reine, and the Belvédère.

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Birch Coffey measuring a detail on the Southern facade of the Petit Trianon

Besides learning about the history of the place, we were also there to study its architectural details and specifically the South facade, which we will later render with watercolors.

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Elaine Rose sketching the south facade of Petit Trianon

I chose to do a value study of the façade. This entails a quick ink sketch of the elevation with some quick washes over that. This helps me to understand not just the building, but also the light and shadows that cover the façade; elements that will be truly important when beginning our final rendering. I also drew a few details around the grounds to help me gain more knowledge about what kind of a space this was as a whole.

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Ceiling detail of the Belvédère

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A “behind the scenes visit” to the Théâtre de la Reine

Overall this was an incredible day that I will never forget! I look forward to taking my studies and using them to develop a more detailed rendering of the beautiful Petit Trianon.

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A view of the Grand Trianon

October 9th, by Isabella DeBenedetti: Monday morning we met at Place de Vosges for a series of drawings. We spent the entire morning studying the building through quick, loose ink drawings, laying on watercolor to study shadows, and completing a few measured drawings. These three methods I found very helpful for quick sketching.

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Leslie-jon Vickory demonstrating a technique of using ink pen to study the composition of the Place des Vosges

After lunch we reconvened at the Studio of Andrew Zega and Bernd Dams for an introduction and practice in architectural watercolor rendering. Andrew Zega led us through a step-by-step instruction of how to cache, create precise lines, and mix colors for shadow, reflected light, and many different surfaces on our test building. The difference in techniques between the morning’s plein-air drawing session and the studio session was valuable to see and experience.

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Ink and wash drawings by Ryan Hughes

In the evening we were warmly received at Atelier Rinck for a cocktail reception. I was fascinated by the level of dedication to craftsmanship and in awe of the incredible pieces they had on display. It was truly amazing to see some of the work they do and hear about some of their current projects.

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Leslie-jon Vickory summarizing the morning’s drawing session in preparation for the next day’s visit to the Petit Trianon

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Connor Moran in the Monday afternoon watercolor session at the studio of Andrew Zega and Bernd Dams

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Participants learn about the history and range of expertise of Atelier Rinck, a 175 year old firm specializing in architectural interiors, millwork, furniture, and cabinet making

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The ICAA Christopher H. Browne Paris Drawing Tour group taking the scenic route to a welcome
dinner at Café Marly

October 7th and 8th, by Alexa Marshall: Over the weekend, the ICAA’s Christopher H. Browne Paris Drawing Tour group began their studies, meeting for the first time on Saturday evening at the Studio of Andrew Zega and Bernd Dams. The many young professionals in the group, from firms including Ferguson & Shamamian Architects and Peter Pennoyer Architects, mingled with undergraduate students from Benedictine College and other established professionals with backgrounds in academia, landscape design, and more.

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The group admiring the Musée du Louvre’s exterior on their way to dinner

The group attended orientation presentations from all four instructors, including Kahlil Hamady and Leslie-jon Vickory from the ICAA’s New England Chapter in Boston and Paris residents and watercolorists Bernd Dams and Andrew Zega. Everyone enjoyed a toast and more time for introductions before heading out to a welcome dinner at Café Marly. The restaurant seated the group in a room that overlooked the Musée du Louvre’s French sculpture court, giving participants a preview of the sculptures they would be drawing the following afternoon.

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The group working on figure sketching exercises in the Louvre’s French sculpture court

The next morning, the Studio of Andrew Zega and Bernd Dams continued their presentation with a more in depth orientation of their watercolor expertise before going to lunch. After the break, students returned to the studio for a quick intro to sketching and wash with Kahlil Hamady and Leslie-jon Vickory. From there the group migrated to the Louvre, settling into the french sculpture court for figure sketching.

Participant Cindy Black's studio ink drawing, Hubert Robert method

Participant Cindy Black’s studio ink drawing (Hubert Robert method)

The group remained until the museum closed, capturing details of a sculpture selected by Instructor Kahlil Hamady and Leslie-jon Vickory.

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Students working on their figure drawing

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