Back To School: Touring the New Residential Colleges at Yale

A view of Pauli Murray College at Yale University from Hillhouse Avenue

Yale University is one of America’s oldest higher education institutions and one of the world’s most renowned, advancing the sciences, arts, humanities, medicine, and so many other fields for over 300 years. Yale also boasts one of the most beautiful campuses, which epitomizes the architectural experience of the American college and undoubtedly contributes to the university’s distinguished position. Recently several participants of the ICAA Young Members Task Force, as well as other young ICAA members and supporters, joined me for a special tour of two residential colleges at Yale that are scheduled to open this Fall semester; the colleges are named for Benjamin Franklin, who received an honorary degree from Yale in 1753, and Pauli Murray, a Yale graduate and groundbreaking civil rights activist, lawyer, educator, and author.

Robert A.M. Stern leads the ICAA's tour group through Yale's new residential colleges

Robert A.M. Stern leads the ICAA’s tour group through Yale’s new residential colleges

Led by distinguished architect Robert A.M. Stern, the tour offered a rare, insightful, and inspiring opportunity for our group to explore the residential colleges in their final phase of construction; as a Yale graduate, the experience was particularly meaningful to me. It is of course fitting that the new colleges were designed by Stern’s eponymously named firm. He served as Dean of the Yale School of Architecture for 18 years, where his impact on architectural education and students has been nothing short of profound. Stern, who is renowned as a lifelong practitioner and educator, was honored with an Arthur Ross Award in the Education category in 2016; he also received an Arthur Ross Award for his work in Architecture in 1991 and a Board of Directors Honor from the ICAA in 2007 (among numerous accolades).

The exterior of Pauli Murray College

The facade of the new colleges

harkness

Yale’s iconic Harkness Tower, designed by architect James Gamble Rogers

The design of the new colleges builds upon a mode of Gothic architecture that harkens to the numerous James Gamble Rogers buildings on campus. The bell tower at Pauli Murray College, for example, reflects Yale’s iconic Harkness Tower, and also serves as an important visual landmark, connecting the new colleges with rest of the campus. This visual synchronicity is, in part, what makes the new colleges so successful and fundamental to the future of the university’s built environment. In addition to allowing Yale to expand its undergraduate enrollment by 15%, the Benjamin Franklin and Pauli Murray Colleges play a crucial role in bridging previously disparate sections of Yale – the main campus and Science Hill.

The bell tower at Pauli Murray College

The bell tower at Pauli Murray College

The richness of the new colleges’ details is perhaps most unforgettable – from the exceptional ironwork in the gates and the exquisitely proportioned buildings, to the study and living spaces. Every detail has been carefully executed with the specific needs of students in mind. Needless to say, to be admitted as a student to the Benjamin Franklin or Pauli Murray College would be a dream come true!

Tour participants inspect the ironwork in the gates at Pauli Murray College

When I was a student at the Yale School of Management, my classes were frequently adjacent to the plot of land where the new colleges have been constructed. While my educational experience at Yale was extraordinary, I recall this area of campus as isolated and remote, without any architectural merit to speak of. I am thrilled to see the space rejuvenated in such a dramatic and positive way by the new colleges, which also share a border with the Farmington Canal that is undergoing revitalization work with the addition of a new walkway and bike paths.

Farmington Canal, bordering the new colleges

The exterior of the new residential colleges while under construction

The tour was a special opportunity, not only to reminisce, but to watch architectural history unfold in the company of our younger ICAA members on the campus of one of America’s most esteemed universities. While touring the new colleges, I was reminded of one of my favorite Benjamin Franklin quotes: “Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.”

Tour participants cross the courtyard of Pauli Murray College

Tour participants cross through a courtyard while touring the new residential colleges

I hope that future students will be inspired not only by the words and achievements of both Franklin and Murray, but also that the built environment that surrounds them contributes to their own intellectual curiosity, growth, and accomplishments. I’m confident it will.

Robert A.M. Stern leads the ICAA's tour group through Yale's new residential colleges

Robert A.M. Stern leads the ICAA’s tour group through the new residential colleges

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Four Students from the Catholic University of America Attended the 2017 Summer Studio in Classical Architecture

The ICAA’s Summer Studio in Classical Architecture introduces students to skills, knowledge, and resources essential to the practice and appreciation of classical design over the course of four weeks. The program serves as a complement or supplement to undergraduate programs across the United States, exposing many students to the foundations of classicism for the first time.

CUA Students Daniel Glasgow, Chas Winebrenner, Andrew Anderson and Tatiana Amundsen sketch on location in Bryant Park during the Summer Studio

CUA Students Daniel Glasgow, Chas Winebrenner, Andrew Anderson and Tatiana Amundsen sketch on location in Bryant Park during the Summer Studio

This year, the ICAA hosted four students from the Catholic University of America (CUA) in Washington D.C., one of the few universities in the country to offer a burgeoning classical program. We asked the CUA students about their experience in the Summer Studio, how it will help them to fulfill their professional goals, and more:

Students sketch on location at the Prospect Park boathouse

Students sketch on location at the Prospect Park boathouse

What have you appreciated the most about the Summer Studio in Classical Architecture?  

Andrew Anderson: What I have appreciated most about the Summer Studio is how carefully the curriculum was constructed, so as to allow for a greatly well-rounded experience as well as a strong exploration of the specifics. In four weeks, we had the opportunity to explore the classical tradition from the perspectives of countless professionals in building design, urban planning, interior design, and historical literature, learn highly applicable skills such as wash rendering, light and shade drawing, and drafting techniques, explore and draw the classical architecture of New York, and visit multiple firms. Yet we were also able to learn the details, drawing and learning the parts of the orders, exploring proportioning systems at a great depth, and applying this knowledge to our pavilion design project.

Chas Winebrenner: The wealth of knowledge the ICAA brings its students is incredible. Having highly educated and experienced, practicing architects join the studio on a daily basis created an enriched and fulfilling environment for students to learn in.

Daniel Glasgow: I have greatly appreciated the personal interest that the professors, lecturers, and staff took in me and my education. The professors taught with a telos and competency that was both attractive and understandable

Tatiana Amundsen: I highly enjoyed the variety of courses involved in the Summer Studio. I am impressed by the quality of the instructors and the speed at which we were able to move from one subject to another.

Andrew Anderson and Daniel Glasgow work on measured drawings at the New York Public Library

Andrew Anderson and Daniel Glasgow work on measured drawings at the New York Public Library

Has the Summer Studio changed your academic or professional goals at all? If so, how?

AA: During the Summer Studio, I was inspired in my professional goals the most by witnessing the dedication of all those who gave of their time, efforts, and resources to help me and my peers have the most valuable studio experience possible. Countless instructors, teaching assistants, coordinators and mentors went out of their way throughout the month to make sure that I personally was learning and growing as much as possible, showing me how supportive professionals in the traditional architecture network are. This has helped me realize the responsibility I have to, in turn, use what I have been given at the summer studio, and in my education at the Catholic University of America, for the benefit of others throughout my own career.

CW: Summer Studio has made me bring more of my attention toward working for a firm focused primarily with residential projects. The ICAA brings its students to many office visits ranging from commercial and residential to interior design, allowing students the opportunity to ask questions and get a feel for what the work is like within that discipline.

DG: Yes certainly! Classicism has been smoldering in the back of my mind for about a year and a half when I first became disappointed with parts modernism. At that time I did not understand what classicism was. I only thought that modernism fell short in some ways and hoped that there was something better. Now I know that classicism is a beautiful language and I look forward to pursuing it.

TA: The Summer Studio has helped me to realize that a career in traditional architecture is achievable and the place to start looking for mentors and networking is within the ICAA. The variety of activities involving student contact with professionals allowed me to begin to understand the type of people who work with traditional architects and to visualize what it would be like to become part of that community.

The Summer Studio group stands in front of the statue of Diana during a field trip to The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Summer Studio group stands in front of the statue of Diana during a field study at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Were there any programs, field studies or field trips that you feel have enriched your education?

AA: Every field experience greatly complemented what I learned while in studio. Classical architecture is designed for the human experience, and drawing on location at a wide range of classical buildings and sites has helped me to understand and experience architecture in a way I couldn’t in the classroom alone. I was specifically inspired when drawing the base of the Municipal Building in Lower Manhattan, as it was inspired by the Arch of Constantine and thus connected with my past experiences in Rome. Field studies at the Municipal Building and the New York Public Library later inspired the way I designed my arches and columns in my Prospect Park pavilion design project.

CW: Our trip to upstate New York enriched my education because of my interest in residential design. Being able to visit two homes and see how classicism can be applied and used within modern means of construction and materials from a first hand perspective was inspiring.

DG: The mentorship program was an impressive program. It was a joy to meet professionals who practice this kind of work, and hear from them about how classicism is done in the contemporary world.

TA: It was nice to visit so many firms! It was nice to see the differences in the character of each firm. I also highly enjoyed being able to learn from so many instructors especially given the quality of each. My interest was never slowed.

Students explore the grounds of Peter Pennoyer’s and Katie Ridder’s classically designed house

Students explore the grounds of Peter Pennoyer’s and Katie Ridder’s classically designed house

Is there anything you’ve learned that you’d like to further develop or investigate in the coming school year?

AA: When returning to work at a small firm the Monday after the Summer Studio, I immediately realized that through my training in the classical tradition I now had a specific type of architectural knowledge and experience that even a majority of professionals do not have. I am excited to explore and investigate how I can now use my specific experiences to contribute to a team in order to increase the quality of design projects, even when they are not specifically traditional.

CW: I learned many valuable skills in the design and representation of a project or idea. The most important skill I learned was during an esquisse exercise, allowing us to explore three distinct ideas and narrow it down to one within a predetermined time frame. I plan to also further develop my technique in wash rendering as well as hand drafting. The introduction of hand drafting and sketching enhanced my creative process without causing limitations that a computer drawing initially faces.

DG: I look forward to investigating the literature of classical architecture. I am grateful to the ICAA for providing me with a few excellent texts, and I am excited to take advantage of these resources.

TA: I took my first wash rendering course and I was surprised both that I liked it and that I was good at it! I will continue to work on wash rendering and watercolor as well.

Instructor David Genther’s introductory wash rendering session

Instructor David Genther’s introductory wash rendering session

What was it like having a mentor advising and working with you throughout the course of the program?

AA: The mentor program has been an extremely positive feature of my Summer Studio experience. While I have learned a great amount from having instructors with a wide range of experiences and knowledge, having a mentor has truly helped to personalize my learning even more throughout the program. My mentor has given me advice and encouragement from his personal experiences in architecture, has shown genuine attention and care for my own passions and interests, and has helped me form connections. I look forward to maintaining contact with my mentor long after the Summer Studio.

CW: Being assigned a mentor was an invaluable connection to the ICAA Summer Studio and the practicing world of architecture. Learning about some of her experiences as an entry level architect through to her current position, helped me envision my transition from school to working as an architect.

The Summer Studio students in front of their major projects

The Summer Studio students in front of their final projects

You can learn more about the 2017 Summer Studio from CUA student Daniel Glasgow:

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Classicist Professional Portfolios

Classicist Professional Portfolio

151 East 78th Street, Manhattan
Peter Pennoyer Architects
(Photos: Eric Piasecki)

135 East 79th Street, Manhattan
Studio Sofield – Architect of Record: SLCE Architects
(Photos: Studio Sofield)

Carhart Mansion, Manhattan
Zivkovic Connolly Architects PC and John Simpson & Partners LTD
(Photos: Jonathan Wallen)

30 Park Place, Manhattan
Robert A. M. Stern Architects – Architect of Record: SLCE Architects
(Photos: Peter Aaron/OTTO)

345-353 State Street, Brooklyn
Fairfax & Sammons Architecture – Architect of Record: Steven F. Levine Architects
(Photos: Fairfax & Sammons)

2, 2A, 4 Strong Place, Brooklyn
CWB Architects
(Photos: Francis Dzikowski)

Park Avenue Apartment, Manhattan
Ferguson and Shamamian Architects
(Photos: Lisa Romerein)

Central Park South Apartment, Manhattan
John B. Murray Architect
(Photos: Durston Saylor)

Park Avenue Apartment, Manhattan
John B. Murray Architect
(Photos: Durston Saylor)

Private Club, Manhattan
Allan Greenberg Architect
(Photos: Wade Zimmerman)

Fifth Avenue Apartment, Manhattan
G.P. Schafer Architect, PLLC
(Photos: Eric Piasecki)

211 Elizabeth Street, Manhattan
Roman and Williams – Architect of Record: Michael Muroff Architect
(Photos: Tara Fedoriw-Morris)

The Sterling Mason Building, Manhattan
Morris Adjmi Architects
(Photos: Field Condition)

Walker Hotel Greenwich Village, Manhattan
Atelier & Co. – Architect of Record: Gene Kaufmann PC
(Photos: Donna Dotan Photography)

The Beekman, Manhattan
Gerner Kronick + Valcarcel, Architects – Original Architect: Benjamin Silliman, Jr. and James M. Farnsworth
(Photos: Erin Laignel)

North Hall and Library, Bronx Community College, The Bronx
Robert A.M. Stern Architects – Architect of Record: Ismael Leyva Architect
(Photos: Peter Aaron/OTTO)

D & D Building Annex, Manhattan
Allan Greenberg Architect, LLC
(Photos: Wade Zimmerman)

Le Coucou, Manhattan
Roman and Williams
(Photos: Ditte Isager)

Augustine, Manhattan
Keith McNally and Ian McPheely – Architect of Record: Richard H. Lewis

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Inspired Places & Spaces: Andalusia, Spain

The interior of La Mezquita in Córdoba, Spain

The interior of La Mezquita de Córdoba, Spain

This past May, I had the pleasure of joining members of the ICAA for The Rich Art & Architectural Heritage of Andalusia, Spain, an 8-day excursion to southern Spain highlighting its many architectural marvels. Along with the other program participants, I was fortunate to experience the rich artistic, architectural, and cultural heritage of five Spanish cities: Málaga, Granada, Córdoba, Seville, and Cádiz.

The bell tower at La Mezquita de Córdoba, Spain, which was previously a minaret

The bell tower at La Mezquita de Córdoba, Spain, which was previously a minaret

While it is difficult to choose one particular highlight that stands out among the many beautiful buildings and spaces that our group encountered, one of the sites that most embodies the architectural style of the region is La Mezquita de Córdoba.

The famous horseshoe arches of La Mezquita

The famous horseshoe arches of La Mezquita

With a storied past that involved multiple transitions in ownership between Muslims and Christians since construction began in the 8th Century BCE, La Mezquita is a stunning example of Moorish architecture. Walking among the famous horseshoe arches and the tranquil hypostyle hall, which contains columns hewn from a variety of materials from disassembled Roman buildings in the area, visitors cannot help but be overtaken by a feeling of reverence as they seem to be transported back in time. La Mezquita stands as a breathtaking reminder of the blending of many cultures that took place in Andalusia over centuries of cross-cultural pollination, resulting in the unique flavor of the region today.

A doorway located in the outer walls of La Mezquita

A doorway located in the outer walls of La Mezquita

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Summer Studio in Classical Architecture 2017 | Week Four

Follow the ICAA’s Summer Studio in Classical Architecture program, from June 19th through July 15th, as students from across the country spend four weeks in New York City and the surrounding region exploring the ideas, methods, and issues related to classical architectural design.

July 15, by Tatiana Amundsen: On Saturday, we arrived at the ICAA library to find rows of chairs facing our final projects, which we had pinned to the wall the previous evening. We were also greeted by the familiar faces of many of our instructors and mentors, who had come to see and review our work.

A panel of professionals evaluates the Summer Studio major projects

A panel of professionals evaluates the Summer Studio major projects

We presented our final project, a theoretical pavilion in Prospect Park, in groups of three. We explained our approach to the design and discussed everything from eliminating lines to the purpose of a gate. After presenting, the students were awarded certificates, invited in as official ICAA student members, and given a copy of “The Classicist”.

ICAA President Peter Lyden presents students with their awards

ICAA President Peter Lyden presents students with their awards

Following the award presentation, we went upstairs for lunch at the Coffee House, where we were able to say our last goodbyes to the other students, professors, and mentors.

The Summer Studio students in front of their major projects

The Summer Studio students in front of their major projects

July 14, by Ximena Vidales: It has been four weeks since we began the Summer Studio, and it’s hard to believe that the final day is upon us.

We spent our last day working in the studio, finalizing all the details for our major projects. After laying out our designs, we had to go back and create line weights to ensure that our drawings could be read from a distance.

Students finalize their major projects in the studio

Students finalize their major projects in the studio

At the end of the evening we pinned our designs to the wall for the final review. It was truly inspiring to see all the new skills we have learned being incorporated into our projects.

A student makes adjustments to their final design

A student makes adjustments to their final design

A student’s final design for a theoretical pavilion in Prospect Park

A student’s final design for a theoretical pavilion in Prospect Park

A student works on his final design for the Summer Studio

A student works on his final design for the Summer Studio

July 13, by William Portales: On Thursday we had our final lecture of the program, an inspiring presentation by Andrew B. Cogar, President of the architecture and planning firm Historical Concepts. His firm designs everything from small houses to town master plans, and it was fascinating to hear how the elements of classical design can be scaled up and applied to the context of town planning schemes.

Students work on their final designs for the Summer Studio

Students work on their final designs for the Summer Studio

The afternoon was spent diving headlong into our final designs and preparing drawings for review on Saturday. We are designing a theoretical pavilion in Prospect Park and it has been a great opportunity to put all the skills we have learned over the past four weeks into practice.

 A student’s work in progress

A student’s work in progress

Interior designer Bunny Williams gives students a tour of her practice

Interior designer Bunny Williams gives students a tour of her practice

July 12. By Reed Thompson: On Wednesday morning we visited the offices of Bunny Williams Inc., our final firm visit of the Summer Studio. Here, interior designer Bunny Williams walked us through the key aspects of her practice and spoke of the how interiors are an integral part of holistic architectural design. She taught us the importance of good spatial sensibilities and why the space one is working in needs to be considered before any discussion of colors or materials can take place. Sketching, she added, is also a great teaching tool for designers, as drawing helps us to absorb information and embed in our minds what our eyes see.

Students work on their final projects in class

Students work on their final projects in class

The afternoon was spent setting up our presentation drawings for the final design project. We have now composed our designs – elevations, plans, and sections – for the final boards that we will be presenting. It is amazing to see the variety of design schemes that everybody has been working on as we put into practice what we have learned over the past few weeks.

A student’s final drawing composition in progress

A student’s final drawing composition in progress

July 11, by Patrick Vercio: Tuesday morning began with our final class of the Summer Studio, led by Kalinda Gathinji, who taught us about tectonics and how this affects building design.

Students compare their measured drawings of the Battery Park City Pavilion

Students compare their measured drawings of the Battery Park City Pavilion

Following this lesson, we traveled to Battery Park where we did a measured drawing of the Battery Park City Pavilion, designed by Demetri Porphyrios. The pavilion’s design leaves the structural elements exposed and portrays the transition from primitive architecture towards a classical order.

The Battery Park City Pavilion, designed by Demetri Porphyrios (Source: Wikipedia)

The Battery Park City Pavilion, designed by Demetri Porphyrios (Source: Wikipedia)

After lunch we continued working on our final projects in the studio. Everybody spent time finalizing details and making last minute adjustments on trace paper, before we begin drafting on velum. We are all excited to see each other’s final compositions at the conclusion of the studio.

Architectural historian Calder Loth gives a lecture in the ICAA's cast hall

Architectural historian Calder Loth gives a lecture in the ICAA’s Cast Hall

July 10, by Molly Kase: Monday morning was spent in the ICAA’s Cast Hall, an inspiring space that contains the ICAA’s historic plaster cast collection. Here, architectural historian Calder Loth gave a lecture on the wide range of literature that has chronicled the advancement of classical architecture throughout history. We then had the opportunity to go to the ICAA’s library and find examples of many of these works.

After lunch, we met at The Morgan Library and Museum, where we were split into two groups. One group went to look at some of the books from Calder Loth’s Lecture in the library archives, while the other did a measured drawing of the library’s rotunda.

Students at The Morgan Library and Museum

Students at The Morgan Library and Museum

Following dinner, we returned to the ICAA for a lecture by Gregory Hoss on the firm David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc., where he is Principal and President, as well as their design process. The rest of the night was spent working on our final projects, getting them ready to begin our finished drawings.

 

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Summer Studio in Classical Architecture 2017 | Week Three

Follow the ICAA’s Summer Studio in Classical Architecture program, from June 19th through July 15th, as students from across the country spend four weeks in New York City and the surrounding region exploring the ideas, methods, and issues related to classical architectural design.

July 8, by Michael Alexander: Today we took a field trip to two houses in the Hudson River Valley: the home of architect Peter Pennoyer and interior designer Katie Ridder, as well as the home of architect Gil Schafer III.

Students explore the grounds of Peter Pennoyer's and Katie Ridder’s house

Students explore the grounds of Peter Pennoyer’s and Katie Ridder’s house

Architect Peter Pennoyer walks students through the house

Architect Peter Pennoyer walks students through the house

Although both houses were recently built, they fit seamlessly into the countryside and felt as though they had been there for years. It was amazing to see the different styles that we have been learning about in our classes put to use in construction, and to see how they made the spaces feel. It was inspiring to look at every detail within the houses and realize the amount of thought and care that goes into the simplest aspects of a building.

Architect Gil Schafer III's house in the Hudson Valley

Architect Gil Schafer III’s house in the Hudson Valley

 Students sketch on the grounds of architect Gil Schafer III's house

Students sketch on the grounds of architect Gil Schafer III’s house

July 7, by Marylu Bartolon Puac: On Friday morning, we picked up where we had left off the day before, working on the art of wash rendering. The watercolor paper we had stretched on Thursday was ready for us to start applying the techniques we had learned. David Genther, our instructor, reviewed every step of the process before we applied it to the drawing and by the end of the class we all had finished our wash rendered drawings.

Instructor David Genther’s introductory wash rendering session

Instructor David Genther’s introductory wash rendering session

Students work on their wash rendering techniques in class

Students work on their wash rendering techniques in class

In the evening, we went to visit the firm of Ferguson & Shamamian Architects. There we were welcomed by Mark Ferguson, who explained to us the many aspects of how their residential practice was run. Then Stephen T. Chrisman, a senior associate, showed us the different studio spaces at the firm and walked us through the one of their current projects.

Students visit Ferguson & Shamamian Architects

Students visit Ferguson & Shamamian Architects

July 6, by Mary Leihy: On Thursday morning we continued to work on our final designs in the studio with instructors Michael Mesko, Keaton Bloom, and Mark Santrach. In the afternoon, David Genther introduced us to the art of wash rendering, where we learned the proper technique for coloring our paper with ink and water. We were also taught us how to stretch watercolor paper and how to think about light and shade when rendering a drawing.

Students practice their wash rendering technique in class

Students practice their wash rendering technique in class

The evening led us to a reception with our mentors where we exchanged business cards and good conversation over food. There was also a raffle, where one of our classmates, Isabella Benedetti, was lucky enough to win Ben Pentreath’s book English Houses: Inspirational Interiors from City Apartments to Country Manor Houses.

Students and mentors at the evening reception in the ICAA’s Cast Hall

Students and mentors at the evening reception in the ICAA’s Cast Hall

July 5, by Margaret Jones: After having Tuesday off for the Fourth of July, we dove right back into our busy and exciting routine, beginning with a field study at Columbia University. For this study, we did a measured drawing of the ionic columns featured in the front façade of the Low Memorial Library. This study allowed us to gain a deeper understanding of scale and proportion and to analyze the elements of design that were implemented by our great predecessors, McKim, Mead & White, inside and outside of the beautiful library.

The front facade of the Low Memorial Library

The front facade of the Low Memorial Library

We finished our morning at Columbia by visiting the archives at the Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library where we had the opportunity to view some original drawings and renderings by several notable architects. These were great precedents to see before we headed back to the studio to work on our final projects for the rest of the afternoon.

Students look at original work in the Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library

Students look at original work in the Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library

We ended the day with a lecture by The University of Notre Dame’s Professor Duncan Stroik. His talk used architectural masterpieces from the Renaissance to disprove the basic principles of architectural design. This was truly fascinating and showed us that it is possible to be creative and innovative while still maintaining the integrity of classical architecture.

Students work on their drawings during class

Students work on their drawings during class

July 3, by Madeline Petty: Monday morning began in the studio, where we finalized our coverage of the Corinthian Order, before proceeding with a lesson on external and internal doorways and corners. After looking at a slideshow with many great Classical examples of doorways and arches, we drew the parts of both according to Vignola.

Students work on their drawings during class

Students utilize a variety of drawing tools to work on their final projects

In the afternoon, we continued to work on our final design that is due at the end of the program, a theoretical pavilion in Prospect Park. The class has goals to establish the plan and elevation at a 1/8″ scale. The evening included open studio, which was a great opportunity to make progress and gain perspectives through our peers, books, and TAs.

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