2017 Arthur Ross Award Winners are a Source of Enduring Optimism

PPA_151 East 78th St_credit Eric Piasecki-600

151 East 78th St, designed by Peter Pennoyer Architects (Photo Credit: Eric Piasecki)

Earlier this month, I was honored to deliver introductory remarks to over 400 guests at the ICAA’s 36th annual Arthur Ross Awards ceremony. Quoting one of my personal heroes, Sir Winston Churchill, I told those in attendance that “We shape our buildings, and afterwards our buildings shape us.” True to form, Winston’s quote is no less inspirational or accurate over 70 years later. His words are also particularly pertinent to the 2017 Arthur Ross Award winners, each of whom has left an enduring mark on the practice, education, and appreciation of classical architecture and design.

Drumlin Hall, designed by Peter Pennoyer Architects (Photo Credit: Jonathan Wallen)

Drumlin Hall, designed by Peter Pennoyer Architects (Photo Credit: Jonathan Wallen)

Look no further than Peter Pennoyer Architects, winner in the Architecture category, which for nearly three decades has played a fundamental role in making classical design a relevant aspect of contemporary practice. Before accepting the award from ICAA Board Chairman Russell Windham and ICAA Board Member Andrew Skurman, Peter Pennoyer told attendees: “In our own work… we face headwinds every day, but being recognized and winning this award makes us feel in some small way that our work and our efforts go towards the battle towards beauty, which I think epitomizes classicism.”

Interior, Designed by John Saladino

Interior, designed by John Saladino

Like Peter Pennoyer, John Saladino has helped further establish the notion that classical design is as timeless and fundamental to beauty as ever. Saladino, who is the second ever Arthur Ross Award winner in the Interior Design category, is renowned for his philosophy of mixing “old with new.” His work – which also includes architectural and furniture design – is eclectic, historically cognizant, and appeals to a broad range of clients around the world.

Fine Arts winner Carl Laubin, who trained as an architect, has become one of the world’s most celebrated architectural painters. His capriccio paintings depict classical works in fantasy settings, including designs by Palladio, Wren, Vanbrugh, Ledoux, and many others. Before accepting his award, Laubin told the audience, “There’s no better way to look closely at architecture than by drawing it. Becoming familiar in this way with an architect’s work for a capriccio, I feel almost as though I’m working for them. I am briefly in their office.”

Castle Howard Capriccio, 122x183cm, oil on canvas, 1996, The Honourable Simon Howard

Castle Howard Capriccio, Carl Laubin, 122cm x 183cm, oil on canvas, 1996

Like the classical subjects his paintings depict, Laubin’s work will remain a source of insight and imagination for generations of practitioners, students, and enthusiasts to come.

Klenzeana, 140 x240cm, oil on canvas 2016

Klenzeana, Carl Laubin, 140cm x 240cm, oil on canvas, 2016

Among the 2017 Arthur Ross Award winners, Thomas Gordon Smith was also recognized for his outstanding dedication to Education. Smith – who is a celebrated practitioner, author, and Rome Prize winner – served as Chairman of the University of Notre Dame School of Architecture from 1989-1998. During his tenure, he helped establish classicism as the foundation of the school’s curriculum and elevate the school to one of the world’s most preeminent architecture programs. Smith has worked at the forefront of training the next generation of classical practitioners, so many of whom are already emerging as global leaders of architecture and design.

Thomas Gordon Smith with students (Photo Credit: Matt Cashore/University of Notre Dame)

Thomas Gordon Smith with students (Photo Credit: Matt Cashore/University of Notre Dame)

Board of Directors Award Winner, Norman Davenport Askins’s impact on the next generation has also been profound. Askins, who established his architecture practice 40 years ago in Atlanta, GA, has served as a mentor to so many young practitioners. Speaking to the audience, he recounted his own unlikely path to classicism and the mentorship he received from the legendary Atlanta architect, Philip Trammell Shutze, the first ever Arthur Ross Award winner and the namesake for the ICAA Southeast Chapter’s annual regional awards program.

A Federal Farmhouse in Atlanta, GA designed by Norman Davenport Askins (Photo Credit: Susan Sully)

A Federal Farmhouse in Atlanta, GA designed by Norman Davenport Askins
(Photo Credit: Susan Sully)

So far an astounding 18 former employees of Askins’s have gone on to start their own successful design studios. Askins said, before accepting his award, “I just love having young blood in my office and it’s so much fun trying to help them become classical architects.”

Macon-Classical-Entry

Classical Entry at a Macon, GA residence, designed by Norman Davenport Askins
(Photo Credit: Brian Gassel)

Fundamental to the education and mentorship that practitioners, scholars, and enthusiasts receive are the books and resources that aid their training, which is why Kevin Lippert and the Princeton Architectural Press received an Arthur Ross Award in the Publishing category. Founded by Lippert 35 years ago, the Press has published close to 1,000 works on every subject from classicism to landscape design, history, urbanism, as well as reprints of classics such as Letarouilly’s Edifices de Rome Moderne (which was co-published recently by the ICAA).

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Kevin Lippert, who along with the Princeton Architectural Press won a 2017
ICAA Arthur Ross Award in the Publishing category (Photo Credit: Jared Siskin/PMC)

The 2017 Awards were also occasion to recognize those whose leadership, dedication, and vision has made a lasting impact on the classical tradition. Stephen Byrns received an Arthur Ross Award in the Stewardship category in recognition of his revitalization efforts at the historic Untermyer Gardens in Yonkers, NY. Byrns founded the Untermyer Gardens Conservancy in 2011 and has since helped to restore one of America’s most important gardens, which is open to the public.

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Untermyer Gardens

I was especially inspired by John H. Bryan, who was awarded a 2017 Arthur Ross Award in the Patronage category. ICAA Board Member Richard H. Driehaus, delivered a moving introduction for Mr. Bryan, saying: “John is a consummate citizen and a prodigious patron of the arts … It didn’t take long for John to emerge as a civic and cultural leader, as well as a proponent of corporate responsibility.”

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ICAA Board Member Andrew Skurman, 2017 Arthur Ross Award Winner (Patronage) John H. Bryan, and ICAA Board Member Richard H. Driehaus (Photo Credit: Jared Siskin/PMC)

Bryan, who is the retired CEO of Sara Lee Corporation, also served as the past Chairman of the Board of the Art Institute of Chicago and Chairman of Chicago’s Millennium Park. He lives with his wife in a landmarked and conserved 1926 Colonial Revival home by David Adler, which is located on Crab Tree Farm, a preserved and repurposed early 20th century dairy farm by Solon S. Beman. Bryan, who led efforts to preserve and restore Daniel Burnham’s Orchestra Hall and the Lyric Opera House in Chicago, is also working with Illinois’ First Lady, Diana Rauner, on the preservation and restoration of the Illinois Executive Mansion in Springfield.

Emily Bedard, Award for Emerging Excellence in the Classical Tradition winner, accepts her award from Simon Sadinsky, Head of Education for PFBC, at a separate ceremony on April 30th

Emily Bedard, Award for Emerging Excellence in the Classical Tradition winner, accepts her award from Simon Sadinsky, Head of Education for PFBC, at a separate ceremony on April 30th

In addition to celebrating the eight accomplished Arthur Ross Award Winners, I was honored to announce before the audience the success of Emily Bedard, an exceptionally talented young sculptor who, at a separate ceremony on April 30th, was bestowed the first ever Award for Emerging Excellence in the Classical Tradition. The Award is an exciting collaboration between the ICAA, the Prince’s Foundation for Building Community (PFBC), and the International Network for Traditional Building, Architecture and Urbanism (INTBAU). Bedard currently works as the Director of Sculpture at Foster Reeve & Associates Inc., which was founded by recently appointed ICAA Board Member Foster Reeve.

The 36th Annual Arthur Ross Awards Ceremony was a remarkable success. The energy and enthusiasm were summarized perfectly by ICAA Board Chairman Russell Windham’s closing sentiments: “Let us focus the celebratory optimism we feel tonight by emulating our honorees, by applauding their generosity, and sharing knowledge by mentoring the next generation.”


The 2017 Arthur Ross Awards ceremony has been filmed and published online. Watch the full presentation below.

 

 

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Green-Wood’s Victorian Artists, Artisans, & Architects

The ICAA recently hosted a tour, “Green-Wood’s Victorian Artists, Artisans, and Architects,” at the historic and architecturally significant Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, NY. Led by Green-Wood historian Jeff Richman, participants were given a behind-the-scenes look at Green-Wood’s art collection and archives, followed by a tour of the grounds and an exclusive look inside a classically designed mausoleum.

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Upcoming Nationwide Continuing Education Courses at the ICAA

Register for upcoming ICAA Continuing Education courses, taking place in New York and around the country through our regional chapters.

NEW ENGLAND

May 27 | Classical Architecture and Art: Gallery Tour and Sketching Workshop

June 1 | Gallery Sketching: Classical Architecture, Interiors and Landscape Workshop

NEW YORK

September 6, 13, 20 & 27 | 20th Century Architecture in New York (and the World): An Inclusive History

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA

May 20 | Drawing the Corinthian Order

May 22 | A Vision of Place: The Work of Curtis and Windham Architects

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 

May 23 | Classical Orders: The Doric Order

June 6 | Architecture of the French Enlightenment

October 7 | Quick Sketching

October 15 | Regional Intensive: The Elements of Classical Architecture

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2017 Award for Emerging Excellence in the Classical Tradition Ceremony and Arthur Ross Awards Discussion

On Sunday, April 30th 2017, sculptor Emily Bedard was honored as the inaugural winner of the Award for Emerging Excellence in the Classical Tradition at a ceremony hosted in New York City.

Launched this year, the Award is a collaboration between the Institute of Classical Architecture and Art (ICAA), the Prince’s Foundation for Building Community (PFBC), and the International Network for Traditional Building, Architecture and Urbanism (INTBAU). Bedard was chosen from a competitive field of young professionals exhibiting exceptional talent in the fields of classical and traditional architecture, landscape and interior design, building crafts, urban design and planning, and the allied arts.

Emily Bedard, Award for Emerging Excellence in the Classical Tradition winner, accepts her award from Simon Sadinsky, Head of Education for PFBC.

Emily Bedard, Award for Emerging Excellence in the Classical Tradition winner, accepts her award from Simon Sadinsky, Head of Education for PFBC

The Award was presented by Simon Sadinsky, Head of Education for PFBC, and Bedard used her acceptance speech to acknowledged the role of organizations like the ICAA, PFBC, and INTBAU in her career success, saying, “When I decided to follow a career in classical sculpture, little did I know that I would find a community such as this that would provide me with the support and mentorship that I now consider so inseparable from my practice.”

In addition to recognizing Bedard’s contributions to classical design and sculpture, the event also hosted a symposium of the 2017 Arthur Ross Award winners. Speeches by several of the winners, or their representatives, were followed by a discussion panel hosted by ICAA Board Member Gary L. Brewer. Watch Parts I and II of the symposium below.

ross-part-1John H. Bryan, Arthur Ross Award Winner (Patronage)
Carl Laubin, Arthur Ross Award Winner (Fine Arts)
Kevin Lippert and the Princeton Architectural Press is an Arthur Ross Award Winner (Publishing)
Jessica Norman, speaking on behalf of Stephen Byrns, Arthur Ross Award Winner (Stewardship)

ross-part-2Gary L. Brewer, ICAA Board Member & Discussion Moderator
Thomas Gordon Smith, Arthur Ross Award Winner (Education)
John Saladino, Arthur Ross Award Winner (Interior Design)
Norman Davenport Askins, Board of Directors Award Winner
Peter Pennoyer, Representing Peter Pennoyer Architects, Arthur Ross Award Winner (Architecture)

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The Institute of Classical Architecture & Art Celebrates the 36th Annual Arthur Ross Awards

On Monday, May 1st 2017, over 400 supporters of the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art (ICAA) gathered at a private club in New York City to celebrate the winners of the 2017 Arthur Ross Awards for Excellence in the Classical Tradition. Established in 1982, the Arthur Ross Awards further the educational mission of the ICAA by recognizing the achievements and contributions of architects, painters, sculptors, artisans, landscape designers, educators, publishers, patrons, and others dedicated to preserving and advancing the classical tradition.

Suzanne Tucker, Gil Schafer, Bunny Williams== 2017 ICAA Arthur Ross Awards== The University Club, NYC== May 1, 2017== ©Patrick McMullan== Photo - Jared Siskin/PMC== ==

2017 Arthur Ross Awards Co-Chairs including ICAA Board Member Suzanne Tucker,
Gilbert P. Schafer III, and ICAA Board Member Bunny Williams

Peter Lyden, Richard Treehouse== 2017 ICAA Arthur Ross Awards== The University Club, NYC== May 1, 2017== ©Patrick McMullan== Photo - Jared Siskin/PMC== ==

ICAA Present Peter Lyden and ICAA Board Member Richard H. Driehaus

Peter Lyden, ICAA President, delivered an introduction to the awards ceremony. Addressing the winners, he said, “Your work and vision not only inspires those in attendance tonight, but your achievements will continue to energize and educate so many who will follow in your footsteps for decades to come.” ICAA Board Chairman Russell Windham – who is also the founding partner of Curtis & Windham Architects – presented the evening’s awards.

Russell Windham== 2017 ICAA Arthur Ross Awards== The University Club, NYC== May 1, 2017== ©Patrick McMullan== Photo - Jared Siskin/PMC== ==

ICAA Board Chairman Russell Windham

The winners included Peter Pennoyer Architects (Architecture); Thomas Gordon Smith (Education); John Saladino (Interior Design); Kevin Lippert and the Princeton Architectural Press (Publishing); Carl Laubin (Fine Arts); Stephen Byrns (Stewardship); and John H. Bryan (Patronage). A Board of Directors Award was also bestowed upon Norman Davenport Askins.

Peter Pennoyer Architects, 2017 Arthur Ross Award Winner (Architecture)

John Saladino== 2017 ICAA Arthur Ross Awards== The University Club, NYC== May 1, 2017== ©Patrick McMullan== Photo - Jared Siskin/PMC== ==

John Saladino, 2017 Arthur Ross Award Winner (Interior Design)

Co-Chairs of this year’s Arthur Ross Awards included Gilbert P. Schafer III, Suzanne Tucker, and Bunny Williams. Honorary Chairs included Janet C. Ross, Suzanne R. Santry, and Ambassador William J. vanden Heuvel.

ICAA Board Members were in attendance, including Anthony Barnes, Gary L. Brewer, Andrew Cogar, Stan Dixon, Richard H. Driehaus, Barbara Eberlein, Mark Ferguson, John Flower, Steven Gambrel, Jared Goss, Clay Hayles, Kirk Henckels, Phillip J. Liederbach, Anne Kriken Mann, Michael Mesko, Lyn Muse, Mark Pledger, and Andrew Skurman.

Distinguished guests in attendance included Robert A. M. Stern, Frank de Biasi, Thomas Jayne, John Rosselli, Brian J. McCarthy, Charlotte Moss, Charles Miers, Patricia Hearst, Newell Turner, Tham Kannalikham, Courtney Coleman, and many others.

The 2017 awards gala raised over $500,000 in support of the ICAA’s mission to advance the classical tradition in architecture and the related arts through education, publications, and advocacy.

Andrew Skurman, John Bryan, Mitchell Windham== 2017 ICAA Arthur Ross Awards== The University Club, NYC== May 1, 2017== ©Patrick McMullan== Photo - Jared Siskin/PMC== ==

ICAA Board Member Andrew Skurman, 2017 Arthur Ross Award Winner
(Patronage) John H. Bryan, and ICAA Board Member Richard H. Driehaus

Stephen Byrns== 2017 ICAA Arthur Ross Awards== The University Club, NYC== May 1, 2017== ©Patrick McMullan== Photo - Jared Siskin/PMC== ==

Stephen Byrns, 2017 ICAA Arthur Ross Award Winner (Stewardship)

Andrew Skurman, Carl Laudin, Mitchell Windham== 2017 ICAA Arthur Ross Awards== The University Club, NYC== May 1, 2017== ©Patrick McMullan== Photo - Jared Siskin/PMC== ==

ICAA Board Member Andrew Skurman, 2017 Arthur Ross Award Winner
(Fine Arts) Carl Laubin, and ICAA Board Chairman Russell Windham

Kevin Lippert== 2017 ICAA Arthur Ross Awards== The University Club, NYC== May 1, 2017== ©Patrick McMullan== Photo - Jared Siskin/PMC== ==

Kevin Lippert, 2017 ICAA Arthur Ross Award Winner (Publishing)

Thomas Gordon Smith== 2017 ICAA Arthur Ross Awards== The University Club, NYC== May 1, 2017== ©Patrick McMullan== Photo - Jared Siskin/PMC== ==

Thomas Gordon Smith, 2017 ICAA Arthur Ross Award Winner (Education)

Norman Davenport Askins== 2017 ICAA Arthur Ross Awards== The University Club, NYC== May 1, 2017== ©Patrick McMullan== Photo - Jared Siskin/PMC== ==

Norman Davenport Askins, 2017 Board of Directors Award Winner

Robert AM Stern, Gil Schafer== 2017 ICAA Arthur Ross Awards== The University Club, NYC== May 1, 2017== ©Patrick McMullan== Photo - Sylvain Gaboury/PMC== ==

Robert A. M. Stern and Gilbert P. Schafer III

Martha Alexander, Susanne Santry, Anne Kriken Mann== 2017 ICAA Arthur Ross Awards== The University Club, NYC== May 1, 2017== ©Patrick McMullan== Photo - Jared Siskin/PMC== ==

Martha Alexander with ICAA Board Members Suzanne R. Santry and Anne Kriken Mann

Cary Koplin, Janet Ross, Sharon Koplin, Barbara Israel

Cary Koplin, Janet C. Ross, Sharon Koplin, and Barbara Israel

Valentin Goux, Peter Lyden, Mitchell Owens== 2017 ICAA Arthur Ross Awards== The University Club, NYC== May 1, 2017== ©Patrick McMullan== Photo - Jared Siskin/PMC== ==

Valentin Goux, ICAA President Peter Lyden, and Mitchell Owens

Duncan McRoberts,Thomas Gordon Smith, Peter Pennoyer, Duncan Stroik== 2017 ICAA Arthur Ross Awards== The University Club, NYC== May 1, 2017== ©Patrick McMullan== Photo - Jared Siskin/PMC== ==

Duncan McRoberts, Thomas Gordon Smith, Peter Pennoyer, and Duncan Stroik

Charlotte Moss, Stan Dixon, Shannon Dixon== 2017 ICAA Arthur Ross Awards== The University Club, NYC== May 1, 2017== ©Patrick McMullan== Photo - Sylvain Gaboury/PMC== ==

Charlotte Moss, ICAA Board Member Stan Dixon, and Shannon Dixon

Nicholas Stern, Tom Nugent== 2017 ICAA Arthur Ross Awards== The University Club, NYC== May 1, 2017== ©Patrick McMullan== Photo - Sylvain Gaboury/PMC== ==

Nicholas S. G. Stern and Tom Nugent

Emily Bedard, Phillip Liederbach, Nancy Power== 2017 ICAA Arthur Ross Awards== The University Club, NYC== May 1, 2017== ©Patrick McMullan== Photo - Jared Siskin/PMC== ==

Emily Bedard, ICAA Board Member Phillip Liederbach, and Nancy Power

 

Photo Credits: Sylvain Gaboury and Jared Siskin / Patrick McMullan

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Architect Sebastian von Marschall on the Joseph Manigault House in Charleston, South Carolina

Editor’s Note: The ICAA is pleased to present the second addition to our new blog series, “My Favorite Building,” highlighting examples of classical and traditional architecture, art, and design that inspire leaders in the field. This post was written by Sebastian von Marschall, an architect at Peter Pennoyer Architects and member of the ICAA’s Young Members Task Force.

Author Sebastian von Marschall standing in front of the
Joseph Manigault House (Image: Sebastian von Marschall)

The Joseph Manigault House, completed in 1803 in Charleston, South Carolina, plays a fascinating role in the architectural history of the city. It was designed by Joseph Manigault’s brother Gabriel, who became one of the city’s earliest amateur architects after studying in England prior to the American Revolutionary War. Manigault is often credited with introducing the Adam style to Charleston, combining a restrained interpretation of the style with vernacular adaptations that set a unique architectural precedent in his hometown.

The cantilevered, self-supporting stair in the northern bay of the house (Image: von Marschall)

The cantilevered, self-supporting stair in the northern bay of the house (Image: Sebastian von Marschall)

The plan of the Joseph Manigault House includes projecting, curved bays, and does not conform to the well known single- and double-house typologies of the time. The bay on the north side of the house contains a self-supporting stair, one of the earliest in the city. Intricate plasterwork on the ceiling of the stair hall is a clear example of Adam style ornament. Elaborately carved mantels, adorned with swags and ribbons, urns and engaged Corinthian columns – some of them elliptical – are mirrored by similar door and window treatments. Many of these features were incorporated into subsequent houses, both renovated and new, with particular similarities at the nearby Nathaniel Russell House, completed c. 1809. One cannot rule out the precedent set by Manigault’s design.

The engaged, elliptical columns and much of the ornament of the fireplace mantel is mirrored in the adjacent door surround in the Card Room on the second floor (Image: von Marschall)

Despite the strong English influence in the house, Manigault incorporated many familiar features particular to the Lowcountry. Manigault elevated the house on a basement and added a deep, three-bay, double height piazza on the south side, taking full advantage of the prevailing breezes while shading much of the house from the sun. Similar porches can be found on earlier, prominent local buildings including Drayton Hall and the Miles Brewton House.

Miles Brewton House (Image: Wikipedia) and Drayton Hall (Image: Loth).

The building is made of local brick, laid in a Flemish bond and using a local tabby mortar – a uniquely successful combination for resisting earthquakes. The high ceilings are ideal for improving air circulation, while a fairly steep, hipped roof accounts for heavy rainfall.

The bay on the North side of the house contains the self-supporting stair, visible just inside the door at the bottom of the picture (Image: Sebastian von Marschall)

Unfortunately, Manigault’s career ended abruptly with his death in Philadelphia in 1809. However, his architectural legacy continues at the Joseph Manigault House, and in its influence on the built environment of the city.

The south facing garden façade of the Manigault House, complete with the garden folly in the foreground. (Image: von Marschall)

The south facing garden façade of the Manigault House, complete with the
garden folly in the foreground (Image: Sebastian von Marschall)

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